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21 Best Flowers For a Beautiful November Wedding

Updated May 30, 2022
21 Best Flowers For a Beautiful November Wedding

Fall may be a decadent time for many plants, but it’s a blooming season for some of the most beautiful November wedding flowers.

Seasonal blooms match the atmosphere and setting, channeling hues of fall nature and creating your wedding mood.

Naturally, many popular flowers nowadays are available year-round. Roses, chrysanthemums, and peonies are always valid options.

But no matter how you admire hyacinths, November isn’t the right time for spring flowers. Fall flowers will look fresher and cost you less.

Match your floral arrangements to your wedding style and color theme. For instance, sunflowers are ideal for rustic weddings, whereas calla lilies fit formal style.

1. Paperwhite Narcissus

While most narcissus cultivars bloom in spring, paperwhite narcissus is in season from late fall to mid-winter. As the name suggests, the flowers are pure white, with a delicate sweet fragrance.

A mono paperwhite wedding bouquet is a stylish choice for brides admiring minimalism. However, if you prefer more intricate arrangements, mix paperwhites with lilies, amaryllis, anemones, or birds of paradise.

Furthermore, narcissus paperwhite makes excellent boutonnieres and hairpieces due to the relatively small bloom size.

2. Sunflower

Sunflowers bloom throughout the entire summer and well into late fall. These sunny flowers are all-time rustic wedding favorites, giving off a cheerful, carefree feel.

Sunflowers come in different sizes and are suitable for bridal bouquets, venue décor, boutonnieres, and flower crowns.

They go well with any wildflower variety, including cornflowers and yarrow, and some textural garden blooms, like dahlia and zinnia.

3. Peony

Peonies are popular wedding flowers available year-round in various shades, from delicate pastels to bright and dark. Some peonies combine multiple colors or change the color as they bloom.

Peonies add texture and volume to any floral wedding arrangement but look exceptionally well with roses, hydrangea, ranunculus, and anemones.

A mono peony wedding bouquet is a trendy choice, though it may appear too spherical. Consider mixing different peony shades and adding filler flowers like gypsophila to diversify the look.

4. Rose

Most rose cultivars are spring or summer bloomers. Thankfully, fall brides don’t have to compromise their love for roses, as some varieties can bloom even in November.

Roses are versatile and work well in any application, from boutonnieres to elaborate floral arrangements, paired with wild, exotic, or garden blooms.

5. Liatris

Liatris is an unusual fluffy wand-like purple, pink, or white flower. Naturally, the latter is the most common choice for weddings, but colored varieties look stunning with other purple or pink flowers.

Liatris is a perfect filler flower, making any bouquet appear creative. It pairs well with many flowers, from exotic amaryllis and calla lilies to traditional roses and tulips.

6. Lily

Lilies bloom from early spring to late fall, depending on the species and region. November brides are lucky, as some of the most beautiful lily varieties are late bloomers, including tiger and double oriental lilies.

Lilies boast a wide variety of colors, including pure white, dreamy cream and pink combination, and vivid orange with black spots.

Due to such vast size and color range, you can pair lilies with just about any garden and exotic flower, from orchids to chrysanthemums. They are suitable for bouquets, boutonnieres, hairpieces, and various venue decor.

7. Baby’s Breath

Flower with a pretty name baby’s breath, also known as gypsophila, is available year-round. The tiny blooms are always white, resembling a puffy snow cloud, but florists can dye gypsophila in any color to match your wedding theme.

Gypsophila is an excellent filler flower, adding an aerial touch to any bouquet. However, small mono gypsophila bouquets are a cost-effective and romantic option for your bridesmaids or centerpieces.

8. White Kale

You may think – hold on, isn’t white kale a vegetable? Technically, it is, but this compact plant with fringed texture and rose-like shape makes unusual and truly gorgeous wedding floral arrangement addition.

Kale colors range from dark green to pure white, depending on the maturity.

Florists pair white kale with a variety of flowers, from roses and peonies to succulents and blue thistle. It’s an unexpected choice for creative brides who love to stand out.

9. Agapanthus

Agapanthus has tiny, clustered blooms forming a globe-like head on a long stem. This unusual flower is available in white, pink, purple, and blue.

Agapanthus may be too modest for mono arrangements but is a stunning addition to your intricate bridal bouquet or centerpieces.

The best combinations with agapanthus are freesias, amaryllis, and paperwhite narcissus. A dreamy mix of blue and white agapanthus and gypsophila is a beautiful bridesmaid bouquet idea.

10. Amaryllis

Amaryllis has multiple trumpet-shaped blooms on a single stem and boasts dozens of color variations, from pretty pastels to vivid red and contrasting shade combinations.

This exotic flower is equally suitable for mono bouquets and intricate flower arrangements, boutonnieres, centerpieces, and various venue décor.

You can pair amaryllis with exotic flowers like birds of paradise, anthurium, and orchids, or garden flowers like lilies, dahlias, and anemones.

11. Anemone

Anemones are deservedly some of the most popular wedding flowers, combining romance with an edge. The delicate rounded petals beautifully contrast with a large black center, especially in the white “panda” variety.

If white seems like a too obvious choice for a wedding, consider red, pink, blue, purple, or burgundy anemones. Dark colors are perfect for a late fall wedding, matching the gloomy nature and adding a bit of drama to your look.

12. Anthurium

Anthurium is an exotic wedding flower with a single waxy petal, available in any color imaginable, from delicate white and peach to unusual green, black, and blue. Some anthuriums are multi-colored.

Anthurium flowers come in different sizes, so you can use them in boutonnieres, hairpieces, venue décor, and bridal bouquets. Although it’s an exotic flower, it looks equally chic with garden blooms and wildflowers.

Mix anthurium with pampas grass, fern leaves, proteas, orchids, and calla lilies, or consider romantic combinations with roses and dahlias. Mono anthurium bridal bouquets look very stylish.

13. Craspedia

Craspedia is one of the most unusual wedding flowers, featuring a globe-like head with tiny, very densely packed yellow blooms on a long stem. Although in nature, Craspedia is always yellow, florists dye it in various vivid shades.

Craspedia instantly makes any bouquet more special, adding a pop of color and fun. Furthermore, it looks well with all flowers, from delicate wild daisies to exotic anthurium and elegant roses.

A mono Craspedia bridal bouquet is an original idea for a preppy or modern wedding. Apart from floral arrangements, Craspedia makes perfect boutonnieres.

14. Bird of Paradise

True to its name, the bird of paradise resembles a tropical bird and can grow up to five feet tall. The flowers are typically white, yellow, orange with blue, or red.

Funnily, in its country of origin, Africa, the bird of paradise is known under a less romantic name – crane flower.

Birds of paradise look the best with other exotic flowers, like calla lilies, tiger lilies, orchids, anthuriums, amaryllis, and various tropical greens.

15. Chrysanthemum

Chrysanthemums bloom from summer well into late fall, boasting many breathtakingly beautiful shades ranging from dreamy pastels to rich burgundy. Some chrysanthemums combine two or more colors.

This popular garden flower can add texture to your bridal bouquet or centerpieces, making them more attractive.

Frankly, chrysanthemums are iconic fall flowers suitable for any November wedding style and location. They pair with nearly all wild, garden, and tropical blooms.

16. Calla Lily

Minimalistic trumpet-shaped calla lilies come in pure white, peach, yellow, orange, pink, purple, and dark maroon.

Calla lilies are ideal for boutonnieres, hairpieces, and other small accessories. Mono calla lily bridal bouquets are especially trendy, but you can pair this exotic flower with birds of paradise, orchids, tiger lilies, or anthuriums.

17. Carnation

Carnations have numerous benefits, including long vase life, cost-effectiveness, and versatility. These ruffled blooms come in many colors, from white and blush to nearly black. Some carnation cultivars are two-toned.

You can use carnations in venue décor, boutonnieres, bridal bouquets, or any other application. Combine them with peonies, roses, dahlias, or ranunculus for a textured, stylish look.

18. Eucalyptus

Greens are the easiest way to liven up your floral wedding arrangements and make mono bouquets more attractive.

November isn’t generous for greens, but eucalyptus is one of a few seasonal plants to add to your bridal bouquet or centerpieces.

19. Dahlia

Dahlias can be easily confused with chrysanthemums due to their spherical shape and a myriad of petals. Dahlia varieties are endless, from rounded pompon to semi-cactus spider cultivars.

There’s a dahlia to fit any wedding style, from pure white to dramatic burgundy and vivid two-toned varieties.

20. Yarrow

Yarrow is ideal for rustic and bohemian November weddings, featuring dozens of small blooms on a single stem. This flower comes in many shades, including two-toned cultivars.

Yarrow isn’t the best fit for mono bouquets due to the flat head shape, but it looks stylish with sunflowers, Queen Anne’s lace, dahlias, Craspedias, and many other wild and garden flowers.

21. Gerbera Daisy

You can unmistakably recognize gerbera daisies by large blooms with multiple petal rows and a large black or yellow center on a long, thick stem.

These popular garden flowers come in many colors and are suitable for nearly any application. For instance, a single gerbera daisy in a tall vase makes a stylish centerpiece, while smaller blooms are ideal for boutonnieres.

Image credit: Pexels

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